Solar Panels You Can’t See

solar roof panels 3

There are a lot of people out there who like the idea of generating their own solar power on their rooftops but just can’t get past the aesthetics.  The panels simply call too much attention to themselves and break up the flow of the architecture.  But recent technological innovations are about to make that a non-issue.

Electric car company Tesla is introducing a new line of solar roofing products using two types of glass tile, solar tile and non-solar tile, both of which appear the same from street level, and blend together unnoticeably.

Italian startup company, Dyaqua is producing photovoltaic roof tiles that are indistinguishable from wood, stone, and terra cotta.

And Sistine Solar embeds into their solar panels a proprietary SolarSkin that reflects back an image, allowing the panels to be customized to visually match virtually any roofing material (or image) you can imagine.

To read more click, ‘The aesthetic solar trend’

 

Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California

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Thomas Keating : The Ecumenical Monk

Thomas Keating and the Dalai Lama

‘Can you imagine a black and white-robed Catholic monk walking the red carpet at the Oscars? This almost happened.

There IS a film featuring this Catholic abbot: Thomas Keating, A Rising Tide of Silence. It qualified as an Oscar nominee and made the first cut of documentaries vying for the Oscar finals.’

“As a young man Keating transformed, becoming more ecumenical, more universal. He sees God in the Big Bang, in quantum physics, in Jungian psychology. He sees Eastern meditation as congruent with his Centering Prayer, both leading to union with the Divine. He wanted other Catholic monks to see the bigger picture, too.”

To read more click, ‘If my grandson doesn’t come home, won’t you please just throw me out the window?’

 

Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California

Nature’s Renaissance Man

 

 

‘There’s a special place in Heaven for people who lock down their land from development, whether it’s through conservation easements that help preserve the family farm or by donating privately owned forests, rivers, and lakes to park districts or groups such as the Nature Conservancy.
But the story of Clive and Clarice Taylor takes such commitment to a higher level.’
Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California

Pope Francis Says ‘No Whining’

pope francis 2

‘Pope Francis has earned a lot of love and criticism for taking the Catholic Church in a bold, new, progressive direction. He has spoken out about climate change, the gender pay gap, inequality in capitalist societies, and even endorsed gay marriage. But last week, he made a move that was downright old school. He hung a sign outside of his office at Casa Santa Marta in the Vatican that says “no whiners” in Italian.’

To read more click, “The sanction is doubled if the offense is committed in the presence of children.”

Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California

The Science of Raising Kinder, Less Entitled Kids

entitled kids

‘Nearly all of us have bang-our-head-against-the-wall stories about our kids acting entitled. We’ve tried what feels like everything to stop it, and we still feel as if we’re not quite getting it right.

But there’s a young and fascinating field of research called behavioral economics that explores the sometimes irrational ways we all make decisions and think about the world. Maybe if we understand a little more about the instinctive, irrational quirks of our kids’ minds, we’ll be better equipped to raise kinder, less-entitled kids.’

To read more click, ‘We never get to do anything!’

 

Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California

Story Telling That Goes to the Gut

Stories are told in the body.

It doesn’t seem that way. We tend to think of stories as emerging from consciousness—from dreams or fantasies—and traveling through words or images to other minds. We see them outside of us, on paper or on screen, never under the skin.  But we do feel stories. We know in our gut when we’re hearing a good one—and science is starting to explain why.’

To read more click, ‘A paper published last year found that witnessing acts of altruism and heroism in films led to more giving in real life.’

 

Covey Cowan, Mill Valley, California